Overseas Press Club

Overseas Press Club Foundation
Encouraging the next generation of foreign correspondents

40 West 45 Street, New York NY 10036 USA| 201.493.9087 | foundation@opcofamerica.org

Each year the OPC Foundation awards a combination of fourteen $2,000 scholarships and $3,000 internships in the name of distinguished journalists and media organizaations :

DAVID R. SCHWEISBERG MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
Sponsored by the Schweisberg Family
Schweisberg joined United Press International in 1980 and worked for its bureaus in Detroit, New York, Washington, Hong Kong and Tokyo. In 1987 he established UPI’s bureau in Beijing. During the Tiananmen Square student uprising in 1989, his astute dispatches, delivered under the threat of censor and arrest by the Chinese authorities, were read and heard throughout the world. He was one of the last reporters to leave when the protest was finally crushed by the Chinese Army.

REUTERS SCHOLARSHIP

Sponsored by Reuters
Presented by one of the world’s oldest and most prestigious newsgathering organizations, this award reflects a commitment by Reuters to help foster the careers of correspondents with an interest in international economics. Founded in London in 1851, Reuters employs 2,300 editorial staff, journalists, photographers and camera operators in 196 bureaus serving approximately 130 countries
 
HARPER’S MAGAZINE SCHOLARSHIP in memory of I.F.Stone
Endowed by John R. MacArthur, Publisher of Harper’s, and the Pierre F. Simon Charitable Trust
In a career that spanned more than 65 years, Stone, a veteran Washington reporter, is best known for publishing I.F. Stone's Weekly from 1953 to 1971, a newsletter that printed the news that was overlooked in the mainstream press. His work almost single-handedly revived investigative reporting. He is remembered as a tough-minded but pacifist gadfly, a tireless examiner of public records, a hectoring critic of public officials, and a pugnacious advocate of civil liberties, peace and truth.

IRENE CORBALLY KUHN SCHOLARSHIP
Endowed by the Scripps Howard Foundation
Despite amazing obstacles, Irene fought her way onto news staffs in New York, Paris and Shanghai. After the death of her husband in China, Irene was hired as a reporter by her friend Roy W. Howard, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of the New York World Telegram. Irene was the first person to tell the world about the romance between Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson. Her 1938 autobiography, “Assigned to Adventure,” was a best-seller.  A founding member of the Overseas Press Club, Irene died in December of 1995 at the age of 97.

H.L. STEVENSON SCHOLARSHIP

Sponsored by donations from family and friends
Former OPC and Foundation president, H.L .Stevenson rose through the ranks of UPI from regional editor in the South to editor-in-chief in New York City where he retired in the mid-80s as a legend, a powerhouse, a terror and an inspiration. He supervised coverage of the Apollo moon landing, the Middle East conflicts and the energy crisis. As president of the OPC Foundation, he started the current scholarship program.

STAN SWINTON SCHOLARSHIP
Endowed by the Swinton Family
Stan Swinton spent 42 years with the Associated Press, filing stories with his byline from 100 different countries. He joined AP in 1940 and also worked for Stars and Stripes during World War II. One of his best known stories was an eyewitness account from behind the German lines in 1945 in which he described how Benito Mussolini was slain and hung upside down by Communist partisans in Milan.

EMANUEL R. FREEDMAN SCHOLARSHIP
Endowed by family
Emanuel R. Freedman, known as Manny, was the foreign editor of The New York Times for 16 years and then an assistant managing editor. He died in 1971 and his widow, Eva Bermant, endowed the scholarship with her second husband, Tobias Bermant. Freedman is credited with hiring an entire generation of correspondents for the Times and building its global presence during his career there, which lasted from 1948 to 1971. He guided coverage of such events as the Korean conflict, the Hungarian uprising and the Suez crisis of 1956, and the 1954 Geneva conference on Indochina.

THEO WILSON SCHOLARSHIP
Sponsored by donations from family and friends
Theo Wilson was the most famed reporter of the New York Daily News when it was the country’s biggest newspaper. She was considered one of the best trial reporters in the business. She flourished from the 1950s into the 1970s and she liked a good time. She also covered the space program, Jacqueline Kennedy’s travels to the Middle East, among other stories. She was an OPC member, good company and popular with colleagues.

ROY ROWAN SCHOLARSHIP
Endowed by family, friends and admirers
Roy Rowan, correspondent, writer, editor and former OPC President, spent 35 years at Time serving as bureau chief in Shanghai, Hong Kong, Rome, Tokyo, Bonn and Chicago, and as Assistant Managing Editor for the weekly Life in charge of news. As a foreign correspondent, he covered the civil war in China, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War and was among the last Americans evacuated from Saigon by helicopter in 1975. Rowan has written scores of articles for Fortune and other national magazines and is author of several books. He has spent his career encouraging other journalists to follow their dreams, a commitment he continues with talented scholarship winners.

FLORA LEWIS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
Endowed by the Pierre F. Simon Charitable Trust
Flora Lewis was a Paris-based commentator on international events for The New York Times for over 25 years. Her indefatigable reporting and graceful writing received wide recognition. She received more than a half-dozen honorary doctorates, lifetime achievement awards from the OPC Foundation and the National Press Club, and awards from the Columbia University School of Journalism and the Aspen Institute. The French government made her a Chevalier in the Legion of Honor.

STANDARD & POOR'S AWARD FOR ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS REPORTING
Endowed by Standard & Poor's
The S&P scholarship was created specifically to encourage talented young reporters considering careers in financial journalism. It is intended to reward the study of accounting, financial analysis, and investment research related to the functioning of global financial markets and to enhance the coverage and understanding of international business and investing. Standard &  Poor’s  is the world’s foremost provider of financial market intelligence, including independent credit ratings, indices, risk evaluation, investment research and data.

THE JERRY FLINT SCHOLARSHIP FOR INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS REPORTING
Supported by family and friends
Jerry Flint began his career at the Wall Street Journal in ­­­1956 and spent ­­ 12 years at The New York Times. He joined Forbes in 1979, holding several senior positions and covering international stories in Cuba, Nicaragua, and Africa. In 1996, Flint became a columnist writing about the automotive industry, where he earned the moniker, Dean of Automotive Writers. He received numerous awards and was recognized by his peers as one of the smartest, most contrarian, relentless reporters in the last century. Flint’s reputation lay in his ability to see a story for what it was, not for what it appeared to be. Click here for more on his career.

THE WALTER & BETSY CRONKITE SCHOLARSHIP FOR ASPIRING FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS
Supported by CBS News and friends
Walter Cronkite was called "the most trusted man in America" during his two decades as anchor of The CBS Evening News. He began his career as a correspondent for United Press International during World War II, then joined CBS television in 1950 as a reporter. He became the evening news anchor in 1962 and held that post until his retirement in 1981, ending each broadcast with "...and that's the way it is," his television signature.  Betsy, his wife of nearly 65 years, was also a veteran foreign correspondent for the Voice of America and the Kansas City Star. 

NATHAN S. BIENSTOCK MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
Endowed by the Richard Leibner and Carole Cooper Foundation
In December of 1964, Nathan “Nate” Beinstock along with father and son Sol and Richard Leibner formed the talent agency N.S. Beinstock, Inc. to represent broadcast journalists. The N.S. Beinstock Inc. Talent Agency has been recognized as the leading agency in electronic journalism, for example, being honored by TVWeek (formerly Electronic Media)as one of the “10 Most Powerful in TV News” eleven years straight - the only agency to ever make the list. Since the early 1970s, Richard Leibner, his wife Carole Cooper and their two sons Adam and Jonathan have run the agency.  The agency has represented, some of the most accomplished electronic journalists of its generation including names such as Eric Severide, Charles Collingwood, Walter Cronkite, Dan Rather, Mike Wallace, Andy Rooney, Diane Sawyer, Ed Bradley, Bob Schieffer, Bill O’Reilly, Lara Logan, Anderson Cooper, Robin Roberts and Norah O'Donell.


Internships

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